Music program holds first ever tech ensemble concert

UNF’s first ever Tech Ensemble Concert on April 19 gave Music Technology and Production students a chance to showcase their skills.

The Music Technology and Production program is one of UNF’s newest degree tracks. With around 50 students in the program total, the curriculum is still developing and changing based on the demands of the music industry.

“This [performance] is really our introduction,” said ensemble director Alex Hayward. “We want people to know that we’re musicians, and we play real music.”

Ensemble director Alex Hayward introduced the group and said he's looking forward to watching the program grow. Photo by Jordan Bebout.
Ensemble director Alex Hayward introduced the group and said he’s looking forward to watching the program grow. Photo by Jordan Bebout.

The tech ensemble students don’t have as many opportunities to perform on campus as the jazz or concert ensembles, according to freshman music production major Jacob Biller. The crowd of about 60 barely fit in UNF’s chorus room where the concert was held.

At the concert, Technology and Production student Ihlan Magloire said he likes his major because “there’s so many paths you can take with this kind of degree.”

Music technology major Gene O’Neil said that the first two years of the program are general education music courses, and the last two include training in Music Technology, aural theory, science of sound, and setting up sound systems.

Production and technology student Gene O'Neil uses a leap motion technology instrument during the piece called "Vocalise." Photo by Jordan Bebout.
Production and technology student Gene O’Neil uses a leap motion technology instrument during the piece called “Vocalise.” Photo by Jordan Bebout.

During the concert, O’Neil used an instrument called Leap Motion Technologies, which he used by holding his hand over a sensor that changed the viola’s pitch depending on where his hand moved. This effect created a modern twist on the classic tune “Vocalise.”

As well as computer-generated and edited sounds, the concert featured familiar instruments like piano, flute, guitar and viola.

The ensemble started out by performing a reggae techno piece in a style called "dub." Photo by Jordan Bebout.
The ensemble started out by performing a reggae techno piece in a style called “dub.” Photo by Jordan Bebout.

“We’re a young department, and it’s just getting off the ground,” Hayward said. “I tried to pick songs that show the variety of things we do here.” Indeed, there was variety during the concert.

The second to last song the group performed was “Alone in Kyoto,” an ambient electronic song used in the critically-acclaimed movie “Lost in Translation” featuring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson.

They ended the evening with the techno-rock indie favorite “Loud Pipes” by Ratatat.

“We get to be really creative, and we add our own effects, so it’s never like the original.” Cassidy Tinnin, sophomore.

As the program grows, students can expect more on-campus performances and more campus involvement.

 

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