Remember Me fails to leave positive experience

Daniel Woodhouse

What is the morality of having the ability to alter your or someone else’s memory permanently? This is the main theme of Capcom’s single-player video game, Remember Me.

In Remember Me’s world, the year is 2084, and humans are addicted to a new device called Sensen. Sensen allows users to share memories with each other. The company that makes these devices is evil for some arbitrary reason and somehow has control over vital services like the police.

A rebel group that thinks the Sensens are bad stands against the company, but all of the rebels use Sensens. If it sounds like I’m going in circles, it’s because an unnecessarily large amount of back-story is yielded during the first few minutes, so it’s difficult to “remember” any of it.

Remember Me’s farfetched plot and lackluster gameplay make it difficult for the gamer to become immersed.

I can’t even identify anything specific about the main character other than her name is Nilin and she seems to have no discernible personality.

The confusing plot wasn’t actually what caused me to stop playing, but rather the gameplay itself.

The main combat consists of poorly designed, repetitive hand-to-hand fighting. Though the game encourages you to dispatch your foes by racking up combo attacks, the enemies are so clumsy that it’s easier to randomly mash the attack buttons until they drop dead.

The fighting sections are made even worse by an unbearable dubstep song that plays every time a fight starts — not to mention the camera’s constant wobbling and spinning all over the place. Sometimes the camera gets stuck on the terrain, which gives you a nice look at the inside of a wall while your opponents kick your teeth in.

One nice thing that can be said is the environments are very well designed and the game has beautiful graphics. Despite this eye candy, though, the environments are completely linear and allow for no exploration.

To sum up, Remember Me is a boring and rather unremarkable game that is easily forgettable.

1 out 5 stars