UNF Spinnaker

Halloween (1978) | History of Horror

The film's modest title screen.

The film's modest title screen.

Pierce Turner

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Welcome to Spinnaker’s History of Horror. Here we will be taking a look back at everything spooky in both film and video games and analyze how horror has evolved over the last century. Check back at unfspinnaker.com every day for a new installment!

We’ve seen vampires, zombies and sharks stalk and kill people in our history of horror thus far, but what happens when a normal person is after your life? Halloween is one of the first and the best movie that answers that question.

Today, John Carpenter’s masterpiece is a household name for horror fans, but back in 1978 it was a modest indie film trying to tell the story of a murderer on the loose. The film stars Jamie Lee Curtis, daughter of Janet Leigh from Psycho. Curtis spend the first half of the movie mostly looking over her shoulder in the quiet town of Haddonfield as she slowly but surely suspects she’s being followed by someone. This is the creepiest part of the film when the masked killer is just watching from afar.

That masked killer is the now famous Michael Myers (no, not the Shrek actor). He doesn’t speak, he doesn’t run, and you really don’t even see his face, yet he’s one of the most iconic villains in horror history. Why? Because he is a human being who feels no pain, no remorse, #noregrets. But the big reason is that score. Director John Carpenter wrote the music for the movie and it is one of the scariest themes ever made.

What Halloween gets so right is the spirit of the titular holiday. There are pumpkins everywhere, trick-or-treaters, horror movies on the tv, and pranks. It makes you believe that anything really can happen on Halloween night. Naturally it’s the perfect film to watch on October 31, so put it on, make some popcorn, and don’t look behind you.

Halloween has a dizzying number of sequels and almost all of them terrible but check out Halloween II which basically acts like and extension of the original, and Halloween III: Season of the Witch if you want something completely different.

__

For more information or news tips, or if you see an error in this story or have any compliments or concerns, contact [email protected].

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • Halloween (1978) | History of Horror

    Entertainment

    “The Lego Movie 2” rebuilds with heart and growing pains

  • Halloween (1978) | History of Horror

    Album Reviews

    Spielbergs channel 2000’s emo on “This Is Not The End”

  • Halloween (1978) | History of Horror

    Entertainment

    “Saturday Night Live” veterans to visit UNF

  • Halloween (1978) | History of Horror

    Entertainment

    Batman: No More

  • Halloween (1978) | History of Horror

    Album Reviews

    10,000 Listens or Less: Shmu – “Lead Me to the Glow”

  • Halloween (1978) | History of Horror

    Entertainment

    PHOTO GALLERY: 15 Views of Jacksonville, 12 views of a night of literary discussion

  • Halloween (1978) | History of Horror

    Album Reviews

    Bring Me The Horizon’s “Amo” is a successful experiment

  • Halloween (1978) | History of Horror

    Entertainment

    A moment in the woods: UNF Musical Theatre Club’s “Into the Woods” review

  • Halloween (1978) | History of Horror

    Entertainment

    Musical Theatre Club takes you Into The Woods

  • Halloween (1978) | History of Horror

    Entertainment

    “Glass”: Unbreakable premise, Split ending

Navigate Right
The Student News Site of University of North Florida
Halloween (1978) | History of Horror