I Love the ‘90s

Katie Gile

'90s icons celebrate the decade students love to remember.

The decade that taught America how to fall in love aboard the Titanic, how to feed a Furby and that a song named “Ironic” could contain absolutely no irony is back in all its grunge glory.
Osprey Productions will present two ‘90s favorites, “Good Burger” and “Snow Day,” for its ‘90s Throwback Night Jan. 11. Complete with free popcorn and drinks, “Snow Day” will play at 7 p.m. in the Student Union auditorium and “Good Burger” will play at 9:45 p.m.

In remembrance of this bygone era, ladies, slide on those girl-powered platforms and gents, throw on your grunge plaid and reflect on the decade before iAnything.

The Flicks:
It’s tough to throw a rock at ‘90s film without hitting a heavily quoted option. Because Tom Cruise had you at hello, Rose will never let go and life is like a box of chocolates, the ‘90s kept it classic.

Among its many stunners, this decade also marked the resurgence of Disney, the rise of Pixar and the time of some of their greatest collective films, including “Toy Story,” “Tarzan,” “Beauty and the Beast” and “A Bug’s Life.”

Comedy chops came to play when “Saturday Night Live” began to bring some of its classic skits to the silver screen once more. From “Wayne’s World” to “Night at the Roxbury” and “Superstar,” there were familiar characters to laugh at and with.

On the darker side, this decade introduced viewers to a new wave of horror. From Wes Craven’s scary satire “Scream” to Jonathan “Silence of the Lambs,” villains had new faces and new methods, each more chilling than the last.

The Tube:
From the golden age of Nickelodeon, complete with football-shaped heads and “Rugrats,” to adult shows about friends and “about nothing,” the ‘90s kept television audiences hooked.

Kids’ shows were primarily hand-drawn cartoons, game shows and the occasional sketch-comedy piece. One sketch comedy show, “All That,” shares more than one thing in common with its adult counterpart, “Saturday Night Live.” Courtesy of these iconic pieces of ‘90s childhood, you know that Arnold’s last name is a complete mystery, the physical challenge is the best option you have and the Procrastinator will help you … eventually.

As the decade progressed, shows began to head toward a child’s version of a sitcom, portraying life for the misunderstood brother or sister in every viewer. The most popular choices were the “Fresh Prince of Bel-Air,” “Sister, Sister” and “Boy Meets World.”

Adults had parlor room shows, sitcoms and dramas. The ‘90s saw the creation and continuation of now-syndicated classics, such as “Seinfeld,” “Law & Order,” “Friends,” “Home Improvement” and “Frasier,” as well as the emergence of screwball sitcoms such as “That ‘70s Show” and “3rd Rock From the Sun.”

The Tunes:
From boy bands setting preteen hearts ablaze to female artists who refused to be “that innocent,” the ‘90s had its share of pre-Bieber Bieber Fever.

*NSYNC, Backstreet Boys, Britney Spears, Mariah Carey and Christina Aguilera were on every CD and cassette while the Spice Girls, TLC, 98 Degrees, LFO, New Kids on the Block and Hanson fleshed out the list of heavyhitters of the time. The playfulness, cheek and youth burst from the seams of the major acts, with hits that any self-respecting kiddo knew, be it “Bye, Bye, Bye,” “Oops, I Did It Again” or “Mmmbop.”

Audiences seeking a continuation of the hip-hop music that had such a major standing in the ‘80s would find themselves supplied with constant music from Dr. Dre, Tupac, Snoop Dogg, Notorious B.I.G., Puff Daddy and the upstart from Detroit, Eminem.

The rock crowd had hits from semi-newbies The Goo Goo Dolls, No Doubt, Nirvana, Green Day and Sublime, as well as continuous genius from hit-makers U2 and Guns ‘N’ Roses.
Much of the new music in the ‘90s was a continuation of the punk movement born in the ‘80s but evolved into the grungy greatness the decade would be known for.

The Fads:
A decade is nothing without its fads, and the 1990s are no exception. After all, no kid showed up to school without his contraband Pokemon cards, and certainly, no child went without her own cooing, warbling Furby to pet, feed and forget about eight months later.

No, the ‘90s were full of fun and frivolous toys, including a line of gross-out fun from Nickelodeon like the strangely viscous, multi-colored goo called Gak, Gooze and Slime.
Where there were children, there were Razor scooters, Beanie Babies with their all-important tag protectors attached, Legos, Skip-Its and Trapper Keepers.

The era of many students’ childhoods was a fun one, with all the classics, color and creativity to call its own.

So here’s to a decade that was all that, phat, dope and occasionally buggin’. The ‘90s were the bomb.

Email Katie Gile at [email protected]