UNF Spinnaker

Book Review: The Sun and Her Flowers brings both heartache and happiness

Rupi+Kaur.+%3Ci%3ECourtesy+of+Google+Images%3C%2FI%3E
Rupi Kaur. <i>Courtesy of Google Images</I>

Rupi Kaur. Courtesy of Google Images

Rupi Kaur. Courtesy of Google Images

Avelina Acosta

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Rupi Kaur. Courtesy of Google Images

Rupi Kaur’s swift and powerful poetry from her first installment, Milk and Honey, returned better than ever in her newest book of poems, The Sun and Her Flowers.  As some of you may not know, Kaur self-published Milk and Honey, which completely changed the game of poetry reading and sales.  

Kaur is an Indian woman who grew up in Canada, writing, illustrating and performing as often as possible.  A year after she self-published Milk and Honey in 2014, she was picked up by Andrews McKeel Publishing, who also later published her new book.  

As you enter The Sun and Her Flowers, it’s heavily focused on her past.  The layout of this one is also similar with the multiple sections and their one-word titles. Each section adds to the next, tying together themes such as the sun, flowers, pain and growing as a whole. The titles of each section are in succession of the life of a flower; “wilting,” “falling,” “rooting,” “rising” and “blooming.”  

In “wilting,” she focuses on the hardships one goes through when dealing with loss and heartbreak.  “Falling” deals with depression and feeling nothing after a life full of loss.  Kaur writes heavily on her family background and trying to assimilate in Canada as a child, and later the U.S. as an adult in “rooting”.  She expresses just how hard it was, but how she’s truly proud to have been brought up the way she was.  “Rising” and “blooming” ends the book with discovering new love, accepting all the pain and loss, and finding the strength to move forward in love and life itself.  

Rupi Kaur unapologetically bares all pain and heartache to the world without abandon.  Readers can accompany her on a journey of self-acceptance as she lays it all out for the world to embrace. If you’re looking to feel all kinds of emotions and come out the other side inspired and motivated, this book is the perfect choice.

5/5 Sails

 

__

For more information or news tips, or if you see an error in this story or have any compliments or concerns, contact [email protected].

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • Book Review: The Sun and Her Flowers brings both heartache and happiness

    Book Reviews

    National Poetry Month: must-read contemporary poetry

  • Book Review: The Sun and Her Flowers brings both heartache and happiness

    Book Reviews

    Hand-picked beach reads

  • Book Review: The Sun and Her Flowers brings both heartache and happiness

    Book Reviews

    Harry Potter and the Cursed Child: ‘A story I will gladly reread’

  • Book Review: The Sun and Her Flowers brings both heartache and happiness

    Book Reviews

    Harry Potter and the Cursed Child: Inferior, sloppy and disappointing

  • Book Review: The Sun and Her Flowers brings both heartache and happiness

    Book Reviews

    Book Review: Not That Kind of Girl is a feminist commentary on life

  • Book Review: The Sun and Her Flowers brings both heartache and happiness

    Book Reviews

    Book review: Murakami has nothing to be embarrassed about in Wind/Pinball

  • Book Review: The Sun and Her Flowers brings both heartache and happiness

    Book Reviews

    ‘Go Set a Watchman’: The so-so draft with a Pulitzer Prize backstory

  • Book Review: The Sun and Her Flowers brings both heartache and happiness

    Book Reviews

    Book Review: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage

  • Book Review: The Sun and Her Flowers brings both heartache and happiness

    Book Reviews

    Book Review: The First Bad Man

  • Book Reviews

    Review: ‘Gone Girl’ leaves a lasting impression

Navigate Right
The Student News Site of University of North Florida
Book Review: The Sun and Her Flowers brings both heartache and happiness