With a cute puppy comes great responsibility

Taylor Leckie

Photo by Keri Weiland

So you finally moved out of your parents’ home and embraced your new found freedom.

Whether you’re feeling alone in your apartment or still spiteful when you recall all the times your parents said “no” to getting a puppy – at some point or another – getting a pet seems like a good idea.

It’s a horrible idea.

You may see students prancing about with their canine companions around town but this only appears to be a picture of happiness on the outside. On the inside, the student is twitching with anxiety because of his or her workload continues to pile up while they are stuck having to take their pet out for walks.

So you have a long shift at work and can’t wait to go on break and relax. In actuality, you can’t relax because you have to drive back home to let your puppy out! Losing the freedom to come and go as you please adds more unneeded stress to your already stressful life.

You may scoff at me and say, “I don’t mind taking walks! What’s the big deal?” Well, after your walk, you come home to stained carpets, a million shredded items and a stepping stool.

Why a stepping stool, you ask? Because you want to keep all your goods up high out of the “puppy-shred-zone.” Any remaining items left unchewed by your menacing, adorable monster was due to that stepping stool. Your professor would either laugh or slap you in the face if you ever said, “my dog ate my homework.” It’s a sad but sometimes true statement.

Despite the damages a puppy can cause to your possessions and mental well being, it’s difficult to look past the cute little tail and into the future. Yes, puppies are adorable but they grow up. And, as you know from your own childhood, growing up costs money. According to the ASPCA, pet care costs for your average dog can cost about $1,500 in the first year alone.

The next time you see a cute puppy in the window, and you’re contemplating the purchase, remember this; according to the ASPCA, five out of ten dogs and seven out of ten cats in shelters are euthanized. This is where they end up because people are too quick to get animals without realizing that they can’t take care of them.

Take caution and consider the responsibility when thinking about getting a pet. Avoid the situation where you can’t pay your rent because you had to pay the vet to remove beer pong balls from your puppy’s stomach.

Or, just be content with being alone. It’s much cheaper.