Faith City Fiasco makes a stir with ‘ugly guy rock’

Faith City Fiasco makes a stir with ‘ugly guy rock’

Spinnaker

by Tyler White

A rowdy, vehement sound comes from the grainy Marshall and Peavey amps that stack up in Faith City Fiasco’s clustered practice space in Mayport.

While sitting to the side watching the band members run through a few of their songs at their rehearsal, my eyes gazed across the tall dark walls as lead guitar patterns screeched and slammed against my left ear and the polyrhythmic sputtering of the double bass drum marched across my right. An old Tupac poster plastered on the wall next to a poster of “Granny” with blood wrenching from her teeth as if she just jumped out of a zombie flick set the scene.

Faith City Fiasco jumps onto the Jacksonville hardcore scene with a middle finger in the air to the bubble gum pop swarming the airwaves with their debut album, “… The Nothing.” Formed in 2007, drummer Dave Dworschak — a UNF psychology junior, guitarist/vocalist Luke Barnes and bassist Trey Modica crafted their sound by blasting up old hip-hop and punk records and drinking to one day hitting a chord with listeners.

“I would say we all listen to more hip-hop than anything else, even though it’s not what we play,” Dworschak said.

FCF, who ironically cites Immortal Technique as a large influence, hopes to bring something new to the hard rock scene with a blend of gangsta rap angst and punk rock riffs.

Recently, the band added Reid Sinden on guitar to make Barnes’ job as a front man and guitarist easier.

Sinden, the “new guy,” has only been with the band for a short time and is still in the process of learning the songs and all of their intricacies. Sinden’s left hand moves up and down the neck of the guitar as if he’s an amateur just messing around with a glossy Strat at the nearest George’s Music, but the sound coming out of the amps contains fleshy rawness and skill compatible with the rest of the band.

Barnes sports a Hendrix tattoo on his right forearm amongst the amusing kaleidoscope of ink. He likes to lay everything out on the table in his open but harsh songwriting. Inspired by Transplants and Immortal Technique, Barnes writes on “Underdog Anthem” about getting plastered.

“You won’t find me slipping into sobriety,” he screams. “I won’t be falling in love tonight/ I’ll be falling down the stairs.”

Barnes also fills in during practices on bass guitar as Modica is training to be a firefighter and works a busy schedule between playing in the band and finishing his education.

‘Nothing’ presents life experiences in a rugged presentation of pent-up anger and debauchery. The album acts as an upfront, yet frequently violent, embodiment of the issues that dwell in the members’ minds. “Patty Wagon Blues” is the band’s coup de grace to police officers with lyrics too graphic for publication. If strong language and sticking it to the man aren’t your style, this album may have you searching for ear plugs.

The group said they want to bring something new and different to the hardcore genre and use their talents for artistic freedom and expression.

“Money would be nice if it came along, but that’s not why we’re playin,’” Dworschak said.

Faith City Fiasco plays with Battle! Feb. 11 at Doozer’s Pub.