Annual exhibition highlights student work; honors presented to best pieces 

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“Tobacco #1” by Michael Wilke, with subject Eric Lake. Photo by Justin Belichis

Nick Blank

"Tobacco #1" by Michael Wilke, with subject Eric Lake. Photo by Justin Belichis
“Tobacco #1” by Michael Wilke, with subject Eric Lake. Photo by Justin Belichis
The crowd thoughtfully examined the work from UNF’s own in the dimly-lit Gallery of Art. The 43 pieces are displayed from several art disciplines such as ceramics, sculptures, paintings and photography.

Some came to buy, while others went to casually check it out.

This year, 65 fine art students entered UNF’s Student Juried Annual exhibition at the UNF Gallery of Art. A total of 125 pieces were submitted.

Juror Julie Dickover, the director of the Crisp-Ellert Art Museum at Flagler College, independently judged and selected the pieces.

Among the full display of selected works, other student artists won special categories, including Best in Show, Best 3D, Best 2D and three honorable mentions.

Michael Wilke won the award for best 2D piece with Tobacco #1, a portrait of his friend smoking. Wilke shot Tobacco #1 in a studio with a five-light setup and afterwards used Photoshop to color the background.

 “I tried to portray comfort and contrast visually through the pleasures of vice that twenty-somethings use through fun lighting schemes,” Wilke said.

Perceived Identity by Stephen Paine, winner of Best 3D. Photo by Nick Blank
Perceived Identity by Stephen Paine, winner of Best 3D.
Photo by Nick Blank
Stephen Paine, and his set of clay masks took home the Best 3D piece category. The twenty-piece mask ensemble, titled Perceived Identity, is the artist’s interpretation of identity and the concealing representation of masks to these personal identities.

“People meet you, and they put on different faces. Everyone has so many sides to them,” Paine said. “These masks could all belong to the same person, and you wouldn’t know because we’re all hiding something.”

Paine used Native Americans and Chinese masks as templates to his own creation. Some resembling  resembled the Jason character from Friday the Thirteenth. The set priced at $1000, consisted of twenty clay masks with varying colors and styles.

Joshua Scott, who specializes in ceramics, won an honorable mention for his Vase #3. But it was his other piece, Reliquary that was purchased for $75.

“The whole form was just a block of clay. Then it was a reductive process, I just carved away. I was trying to make it all come from the same place,” Scott said of Reliquary.

Pillows of Discomfort by Jessica Perriera, honorable mention. Photo by Nick Blank
Pillows of Discomfort by Jessica Perriera, honorable mention. Photo by Nick Blank
Jessica Perriera also won an honorable mention for Pillows of Discomfort. She took pictures on her cellphone and then applied them onto pillows with a laser jet printer. She developed a tangible contrast by printing images  of rocks and nails on soft pillows. This, according to Perriera, betrays the feeling of comfort normally associated with pillows.

“I saw videos of people making art with pillows online. I wanted to see what things would contrast those soft feelings,” Perriera said of her work, which was not for sale.

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Station by Cody Rose, winner of Best in Show. Photo by Nick Blank
Cody Rose’s acrylic painting, Station, won the $150 prize for Best in Show. Rose did not attend the award ceremony at the UNF Gallery of Art.

The other honorable mention went to Ian Skinner for Pan Handlers— a sculpture depicting a pair of chained hands. Skinner wasn’t in attendance at the awards reception.

Pan Handlers by Ian Skinner, honorable mention. Photo by Nick Blank ​​​​​​
Pan Handlers by Ian Skinner, honorable mention. Photo by Nick Blank
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Jim Draper, Coordinator of UNF art galleries, said he was proud student’s work.

“Great art says something,” Draper said. “This exhibition is the perfect opportunity for students to showcase their work.”

The exhibit will remain on display at the UNF Gallery of Art until March 4.

 

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